Helium and Hope: The Rise of the Airship in post-Moon North America

The maiden flight of Seraph-5 outside of St. Louis in 1874. Part of Church & State engineer Henry duValle's famous Seraph line, the S-5 flew eight miles around the City-State and landed safely. Archangel Project would launch in 1877, based on duValle's designs, and provide the logistical infrastructure that enabled C&S North American operations in the 1880s.
The maiden flight of Seraph-5 outside of St. Louis in 1874. The most famous of Henry Valiant’s Seraph line, the S-5 flew eight miles around the City-State and landed safely. The Archangel Initiative would launch in 1877, based on Valiant’s designs, and provide the logistical infrastructure that enabled Church & State operations in the 1880s.
This photograph, credit unknown, was taken during the ill-fated Tabernacle Expedition. Interestingly, there is anecdotal evidence that it was taken after the ambush on May 8th. That implies that the replaced travelers continued to pose for photographs.
This photograph, credit unknown, was taken during the ill-fated Tabernacle Expedition. Interestingly, there is anecdotal evidence that it was taken after the ambush on May 8th. That implies that the worm-worshipers continued to pose for photographs and go about their day-to-day business, despite widespread infestation.

For all intents and purposes, rural America died three months after the Black Moon rose in 1867.  The last refugee column–Father Walter’s miraculous arrival, later immortalized by Haddon Sundblom’s A Christmas Promise–reached Chicago in 1868. Other camps are recorded after 1868 but were turned away at the city gates, revealed to be madmen or witch-packs in disguise, or made to settle among wilderness peoples and/or local Didikko tribes.

In the two years that followed, the City-States maintained tenuous connections via relatively stable, albeit dangerous, caravan routes. Traveling under heavy guard and moving swiftly by horse and mule along old rail beds and roadways, these convoys provided limited ability to move critical personnel (mostly military or scientific) or supplies (some luxury goods, but mostly the products of companies like Colt and Winchester).

However, on May 8th, 1870, a 200-man convoy was ambushed approximately 10 miles outside of Philadelphia. The convoy escaped and arrived at the city with minimum casualties on May 9th.…

Boston City Hospital, 1867: The ‘first’ postmortem examination of Moonspawn

This photograph's accuracy cannot be independently verified, but it was included with a series of dispatches sent from Boston to the Johnson administration in 1867. Wentworth subsequently provided it to the New-York Historical Society in 1868.
This photograph ran in the Boston Post on Dec. 20, 1867, accompanying what is widely considered to be the first published article addressing the existence of Moonspawn. Second from the right is Samuel Fogg of Boston City Hospital. At far right is Professor Lewis Vanderhilt of Havard. The nurse and assistants to the left of Fogg are unidentified. While the photograph is credited toward John Bishop, the Post journalist that wrote the article, it was more likely taken by a staff photographer, with Bishop claiming the credit in order to minimize the staff’s exposure to federal reprisal.

The Federal government and the American cities (later, City-States) pursued different tactics in publicly addressing the rise of “Moonspawn”–the wide-ranging collection of unnatural, post-Moon plants and animals that span numerous biological kingdoms.

Prior to its collapse in 1868, the Federal government undertook a systemic campaign of medical misinformation, downplaying the havoc Moonspawn were wrecking throughout rural America. Increasingly stringent controls upon hospitals and universities resulted in a backlash by these naturally-progressive institutions, culminating in the John Hopkins Rebuke of Nov. 17, 1867.

After Federal artillery had reduced the famed Baltimore hospital to rubble, a number of doctors angrily rejected demands to cease Moonspawn postmortem examinations. The most famous of these “protest procedures” was conducted at the Boston City Hospital on Nov. 21, 1867. Excerpts of the postmortem ran in the Boston Post that very day as a special daily edition (also known as a bulldog), under the headline ‘MONSTERS STALK BOSTON.’

BOSTON, MASS.